Atlanta Caribbean Carnival Unites as One Festival for 2024

Written by: Entertainment Junkie

After a period of anticipation and excitement, the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival proudly announces its return as a unified festival for 2024. In a celebration of vibrant culture, rich traditions, and the spirit of unity, the annual festival promises to deliver an unforgettable experience for attendees from all walks of life.

Scheduled to take place on Memorial Day Weekend (May 26th – 29th), the 37th Atlanta Caribbean Carnival will bring together communities, artistes, and enthusiasts from across the Caribbean diaspora and beyond. This year’s event marks a significant milestone as it presents a cohesive and united celebration, reflecting the strength and resilience of the Caribbean culture.

Organizers of the festival, the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival Bandleaders Association (ACCBA) have diligently worked to curate a diverse lineup of events, showcasing the dynamic rhythms, artistry, colourful costumes, and captivating cultural elements that define Caribbean heritage. From pulsating Soca beats to mesmerizing steel pan melodies, the festival will offer a sensory journey into the heart of the West Indies.

In addition, to the official downtown Atlanta Caribbean Carnival parade route featuring full street closure on May 25th as well as a relocated stage in the parking lot of the festival village (Westside Park) for the post-parade concert extravaganza, the festival season will also include the beloved Children’s Carnival on May 11th, the ACCBA J’ouvert which returns as a nighttime affair on May 24th and ‘Submerged’ a new cooler fete experience on May 26th.

Regarding the citizens of Atlanta and surrounding cities getting to enjoy one Carnival experience for the first time in years, ACCBA President Patricia Tonge Edigin shared, “We are thrilled to announce the return of the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival as a unified festival for 2024. This year’s event embodies the spirit of togetherness and celebrates the rich tapestry of Caribbean culture. We invite everyone to join us for a fantastic, safe, and memorable time.”

In keeping with its 2024 theme ‘One Caribbean Carnival’ the ACCBA has assembled a true cross-Caribbean cast of performers which include Trinidad’s 2024 Road March Champ Mical Teja, Jadel,  SVG’s Problem Child, Barbados’ Lil Rick and DJ Cheem, Antigua’s Burning Flames and Tian Winter, Jamaica’s Kiprich, USVI’s Pumpa, St. Lucia’s Motto and Teddyson John, Dominica’s Asa Banton (who will also serve as a 2024 Parade Grand Marshal) and more.

The Atlanta Caribbean Carnival serves as a platform for cultural exchange, fostering understanding, appreciation, and unity among diverse communities. As the festival returns in full force for 2024, it reaffirms its commitment to celebrating diversity and promoting inclusivity.

The Westin Hotel Peachtree Plaza and the Courtyard Marriott Atlanta Downtown are the official host hotels for the 2024 Downtown Atlanta Caribbean Carnival.

For further info on mas bands, hotel booking and event tickets please visit www.atlantacarnival.org/ AND follow the brand on social media via: Facebook: www.facebook.com/AtlantaCarnival & Instagram: www.instagram.com/officialatlantacarnival/

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